Archive for November, 2009

Nov 30 2009

Into the Forest

Fly Agaric Mushrooms on the Mendocino Coast

Guess we should change our voicemail and sign outside of our shop from we are on the water to we are in the forest. Fall and winter is one of our favorite times of the year for hiking and mountain biking in the forests of Mendocino County. We have lots of great singletrack trails for mountain biking and lots of colorful and choice edible mushrooms in the forest.

Ride thru Tree

We are still paddling and enjoying the colorful migratory ducks that are visiting us for the winter on the Noyo. On Saturday in addition to the mallards, harlequin duck, green-winged teals, and 40+ buffleheads; we enjoyed watching a colorful wood duck drake.

Bufflehead drakes on the Noyo River

Our mushroom paddles were a lot of fun. We started the paddles with a short lesson on the basics of mushroom identification followed by looking at and identifying the wild mushrooms growing along the Noyo. Finding a King Bolete growing along the river was very exciting. (especially for a boletivore like me – no I didn’t pick it).

Finding a King Bolete on a Noyo River Mushroom Paddle

We just finished our first session of Intro to Kayaking at Fort Bragg’s new aquatic and recreation facility – the CV Starr Community Center. It is beautiful!!! We are enjoying drop in kayak night on Mondays for eskimo roll practice and kayak fun and games until January 11 when our new Intro to Kayaking Class begins.

Eskimo Rolling in the pool of CV Starr Aquatic Center in Fort Bragg, CA

Hmmm . . . wood ducks on the Noyo? I bet we write more on this subject in the future. Stay tuned.

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Nov 05 2009

Confessions of a Boletivore

Published by under bolete,Mendocino,mushrooms

Hi, my name is Cate and I am a boletivore.
David Arora in his book Mushrooms Demystified defines boletivores as —- predators of boleteus edulis – King Bolete. The King Bolete (boleteus edulis) is considered to be one of the best edible species of wild mushroom. I love the size and shape of it. It is exciting to spy one growing out of the forest floor. Just one is enough for dinner unlike other mushrooms that require a bit more gathering.


After the first fall rains, I disappear into the forest of the Mendocino Coast in search of these delicious fungi which I enjoy dry-sauteeing, grilling, drying, and sharing with friends.

Even when paddling, I am scouting the banks of our rivers for wild mushrooms. The boletes are one of my favorites; however, I admire all forms of fungi and enjoy trying to identify them. Some are easy like this amanita muscaria (aka Alice in Wonderland Mushroom) and others are more challenging.


Boletivore, mushroom-head, crazy, . . . whatever . . .

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